How Less Value Turns Into Added Value | Targetprocess - Visual management software

We live in the age of added value. It's everywhere. Value-added services, value-added products, value-added goods etc. etc. etc.  Actually, so much value has been pumped up in our life, that it's even strange that this value is not protruding from us like clothes from an overly packed vacation suitcase.

How Less Value Turns Into Added Value

If we take a closer look at the back side of added value, a huge surprise is waiting there. The example I find most notorious is cell phones. What if I want a simplistic cell phone with NO Internet, no camera, even no voice mail, just live calls and SMS?  You'll never ever find such a phone.

I bet that a phone manufacturer who stops the rush for more new features, would make a fortune in an instant selling the "new frugal" cell phones. In this case, the added value is content which comes from Internet, capabilities to exchange content. Why should someone want a phone without Internet?  My word, very soon we will see such phones on the market. The niche for them is already there. Here's why:

More content and more various channels to produce and exchange content is now commonly presented as added-value. Hence, a communication device which happens to be a humble phone is supposed to deliver this value. But as we're oversaturated with content, no buzz is a huge deal. The luxury of focusing on one thing at a time is something that only a few can afford. Besides, it'd be very frugal (frugal is actually the new buzzword 🙂 to buy a phone for a reasonable price, and sell a used iPhone to some geek. Oh, pardon me. It's all about iPads now 🙂

There're plenty of such examples. Another one: the added value of having a car means lack of natural movement, the necessity to pay for gym etc. It actually brings along the whole array of more added value  goods and services that turn out to be not of added value but of less value, since you pay for what you could do naturally.

Take organic products. Now they're added value. 100 years ago who could have thought that something natural adds value? Now it's a rollback. What is simple and natural costs more, but has less value compared to the original added value concept for the matter, and the cycle goes on and on.

And we're nailing it down to our favorite: project management tools. Versatility and too many features now have bounced back to the simplistic Kanban board.

It looks like it's time to not only practice lean production, but to produce lean products. Gaining focus requires focused tools, one way or another.